The Stephan Archives on Alumni Weekend

Coming to campus on Alumni Weekend, May 2-4, 2013? Check out what is going on in the Stephan Archives as part of your visit!

Exhibits

Life in Old Lower

OldLower5501Due to popular demand, the Life in Old Lower exhibit, first displayed during Alumni Weekend 2011, will be on display again in the Bunn Library for Alumni Weekend 2013 and continuing through Memorial Day (May 27.) The exhibit features a life-size reconstructed Old Lower cubicle, decorated as it would have been in 1965. Located in the Main Lobby of the Bunn Library.

Now You’re Cooking!: The History of Dining at Lawrenceville

Cooking display caseThe Stephan Archives are celebrating nearly two centuries of culinary excellence in “Now You’re Cooking! The History of Dining at Lawrenceville,” currently on display in the Stephan Archives reading room during regular library hours. Nearly 50 items will be on exhibit, including a century-old Tiffany & Co. tea set, locally produced china, a colonial-era glass bottle, and even a recently retired plastic cafeteria tray. Foodies will be especially fascinated by the Calliopean Society banquet menus, which date back to 1893 and feature such delights as terrapin soup, frozen nesselrode pudding, and consommé pritaniere.  Through October 2013.

Celebrating 25 Years of Coeducation at Lawrenceville

1985 Lawrentian coverA visual timeline of the history of women on Lawrenceville’s campus before and after coeducation, Lawrenceville female “firsts,” and the story of the historic 1985 decision to accept female students.  Located in the display cases in the Main Lobby and on the second floor of the Bunn Library, through July 1.

School Presidents of the Major Reunion Years

1888 WintonA rotating slide show featuring the School Presidents from the classes ending in 3s and 8s, located in the Archives Reading Room of the Stephan Archives. Through May 27.

In the Hutchins Gallery, Gruss Center of Visual Arts

“From His Friend – Abraham Lincoln”

Lucy Harmon McPherson001An exhibit of the School’s collection of Lincolnalia, including a lock of Abraham Lincoln’s hair in a mourning locket, a copy of the Lincoln-Douglas Debates, and other memorabilia from the family of Lucy Harmon McPherson, wife of Lawrenceville Head Master Simon J. McPherson. Only available through Alumni Weekend.

Other Events

Archives Open House

An opportunity to see the new archives storage and exhibit spaces will take place on Saturday, May 4, from 2- 4 p.m. While visiting the renovated space, check out our demo of the newly digitized historical Lawrence at digitalarchives.lawrenceville.org.

1852 plan for the “school house”

The 1852 Catalog of the Lawrenceville School helpfully included a floor plan for the “school house” — the building today known as Haskell House, which served as the main classroom building from 1832 until Memorial Hall (now Woods Memorial Hall) was built in 1885.  Hamill House, built in 1814, was where boarders lived. Below you see the exterior of the School House on the left and what is now the Hamill House on the right. As you can see from the diagram of desks, the teacher sat at the back of the classroom (marked a) where he could keep an eye on the students.

1852 School House Plan

1852 School

Let it snow!

With what is promising to be another intense snowstorm moving onto the East Coast, the Stephan Archives pulled out some of the photos from past historical snowstorms that have hit Lawrenceville, including one in 1902 and the renown Blizzard of March 1914.

Photo taken on Main Street looking South following 1902 snowstorm.

Photo taken on Main Street looking South following 1902 snowstorm.

Undated early snowstorm photo in the village of Lawrenceville, c. 1900

Undated early snowstorm photo in the village of Lawrenceville, c. 1900

Looking up Green Street following the March 1914 blizzard.

Looking up Green Street following the March 1914 blizzard.

We have no idea who "Mr. Woods" is, but we do know this photo is from the blizzard that struck New Jersey in March 1914.

We have no idea who “Mr. Woods” is, but we do know this photo is from the blizzard that struck New Jersey in March 1914.